Destination: Swansea

24 Jun 11 One Comment

I’ve been bursting to tell you all about this for weeks. We’re moving to South Wales! We’ve taken a gorgeous flat right on the Marina and we’ll be splitting our time between Swansea and the Costa del Sol.

I’m really looking forward to this (despite all the dire weather predictions) and I hope to share my experiences there with all of you.

So of course, the first thing is to check out the local airport, right? Right!

Location: Swansea
Airfield: EGFH
Website: Swansea Airport – Maes Awyr Abertawe (but more information at NATS | Swansea )
Chart: PDF chart for EGFH
Phone Number: +44 1792 204063
ATSU +44 1792 208182 (strictly PPR)
Fax: +44 1792 207550
Hours: Winter 0900-1730 / Summer 0800-1630
Frequencies: 119.7 A/G
Runways: 04/22 1,350m concrete
10/28 857m asphalt
Note: Runways 04/22 and 10/28 have undulating surface.
Runways 10, 22 and 28 have displaced thresholds.
Airfield Height: 299 ft.
Circuits: Unless otherwise notified by ‘Swansea Radio’ standard circuit directions are as follows:
Runway 10 and 22 – Right Hand; Runway 28 and 04 – Left Hand.
Fuel: AVGAS 100LL
Weather Info: Cardiff Weather Centre
Divert: Cardiff

Google Map View:

Swansea Airport – Wikipedia

Swansea Airport was built on what was originally common land during World War II. The aerodrome was opened on 15 June 1941 as RAF Fairwood Common, after taking nearly a year to develop. It was originally built to be a fighter station. The airport became a sector station within months of opening, taking on the responsibility of the air defence for the whole of South Wales.

The airfield fulfilled a variety of military roles during World War II, following which it was decommissioned by the RAF in 1946. It was not until 1956 that the RAF released the airport land to Swansea Corporation to allow the airport to be developed for commercial usage.

I’ve already popped by to take a look around and I can report that the people were friendly and outgoing and the coffee shop was very comfortable. Within half an hour I had a new friend telling me all about the history of the airfield. I’m hoping I’ll be able to tell you more about that in the coming months.

Meanwhile, if you want to know why I’m excited about going to Wales, take a look at this clip from Fighter Pilot, paying close attention to the countryside they are flying over:

Category: British Mainland,

One Comment

  • I loved the ‘With an engine failure, even if you pull up from 420 knots you only get 4000 feet’.

    I think 4000 feet would be enough for me to do a PFL in my PA28 :)

    Andy

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